Press Releases from Our Members

Bidwell House Museum Event – Birding Walk, Sunday June 3

Sunday, June 3

Birding Beyond Your Backyard with Doug Bruce and Tom Ryan.  Free. Held at The Bidwell House Museum, 9-11am.  For more information call 413-528-688 or go to www.bidwellhousemuseum.org. 

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Birding Beyond Your Backyard with Doug Bruce and Tom Ryan is designed for beginning birders who would like to expand their birding knowledge.  This talk and walk will help take you from feeder birds (blue jays, chickadees) to the birds of field and forest. Can’t tell a robin from a crow?  No shame – we’ll show you how we do it.  After just one walk you’ll amaze your friends with cheap birding tricks! This walk is all about birds of the upland forest:  we’ll walk the trails on Bidwell’s 190+ acres of beautiful hemlock-hardwood forest.  Footing is good; very moderate elevation changes.  Wear good shoes; bring water and a snack. Co-sponsored by the Hoffmann Bird Club and DCR Service Forestry.

The Bidwell House Museum is a New England heritage site providing a personal encounter with history, early American home life, and the Berkshire landscape through its land, house and collection. The Museum is a non-profit educational institution for the benefit of the community and today’s audiences of all ages, dedicated to preservation, scholarship and enjoyment of the landmark site.

 

The Museum is open Thursdays to Mondays (closed Tuesdays and Wednesdays) from 11 am to 4 pm with tours on the hour, Memorial Day to Columbus Day. The museum grounds—192 acres of woods, fields, historic stonewalls, trails and picnic sites—are open all year free of charge. The program of events can be found on the museum’s website: www.bidwellhousemuseum.org.

Bidwell History Talk— The Silver Mountain: The Forgotten Story of the Most Extraordinary Place in all of Colonial America

On Saturday, June 2 at 10 a.m. award-winning historian John Demos will describes the remarkable history of Potosi during its heyday as the world’s greatest silver mine and fulcrum of the Spanish colonial empire. Founded in what is today southern Bolivia during the mid-16th century, Potosi quickly rose to become by far the largest human community in the Western Hemisphere, a source of wealth that transformed the international economy, and, not least, the mother of all boom towns. But it was, at the same time, virtually genocidal for the indigenous population. Thus it stands, in major respects, as an epitome of the massively consequential invasion of the New World by the Old

John Demos, Samuel Knight Professor of American History Emeritus at Yale University is an award-winning author and Tyringham resident. He is the author of numerous books, including The Unredeemed Captive: A Family Story from Early America, and The Heathen School: A Story of Hope and Betrayal in the Age of the Early Republic, a 2014 National Book Award finalist and most recently Puritan Girl Mohawk Girl. His book Entertaining Satan: Witchcraft and the Culture of Early New England (1982) won the Bancroft Prize.

The Bidwell House Museum History Talks are held at Tyringham Union Church, Main Road, Tyringham at 10 a.m. Suggested donation $15 per person, $10 for members of the museum.

The Bidwell House Museum is located at 100 Art School Road, Monterey, MA. For more information, please call 413-528-6888 or go to www.bidwellhousemuseum.org.

Artist Residency at the Red Lion Inn in Partnership with IS183 Art School of the Berkshires

The Red Lion Inn announces its second annual summer artist residency.

In the summer of 2017, The Red Lion Inn created an artist-in-residence program to celebrate the artistic and creative energy of the Berkshires, and invited artists to interpret and express The Inn’s spirit through their work. This year, the Red Lion is excited to partner with IS183 Art School of the Berkshires to further develop the Residency program.

The 2018 artist in residence is Bill Wright of Pittsfield, an accomplished photographer and active local citizen.

Main Street Hospitality CEO Sarah Eustis, says, “The program enables us to invite new perspectives and ways of connecting with our beloved Inn and historic landmark. I am excited to welcome Bill as The Red Lion Inn’s second annual summer artist in residency, Bill is a talented artist whose work is able to encompass and express The Red Lion Inn’s character in a modern way.”

For the entirety of the residency, from Memorial Day (May 28) to Labor Day (September 3), Wright will be creating work, using the Red Lion Inn spaces as his studio and inspiration.

“Increasing access to the visual arts is what IS183 Art School is all about—we are thrilled to be partnering with the Red Lion Inn to create an experience for residents and visitors to engage with an artist’s studio experience”, says Lucie Castaldo, IS183 Art School’s Executive Director.

Events surrounding the residency will consist of artist talks, a closing reception over Labor Day weekend, and an exhibition following his residency.

“I love the idea of playing with light and long exposure to show the ghostly past and present, while having the opportunity to gain access to the beautiful history and explore what the walls will say,” said Bill Wright.

Bill Wright was born in Bridgeport, Connecticut, and graduated from the Colorado Art Institute in 2000. He is currently a resident of Pittsfield, Massachusetts. After working in the commercial photography industry for a decade, he embarked on a monumental artistic project on American Veterans that became VETS. Other projects include Papermakers, a portrait series of the employees of Crane Paper Company, and ongoing projects such as The Answer is Never the Answer, and Chefs & Farmers. He shares his time between personal art projects and other commissioned work. His work has been exhibited in galleries and museums in the U.S. Bill Wright, is also a member of IS183 Art School’s esteemed faculty. He is actively involved in the improving the quality of life in the Berkshires through cultural, political, and social engagement BillWrightPhoto.com

The Red Lion Inn (c. 1773), a charter member of Historic Hotels of America, has been providing food and lodging to guests for more than two centuries. The Inn offers 125 antique-filled rooms and suites, four restaurants with formal and casual dining with locally sourced food, a gift shop featuring locally made items, a pub with nightly entertainment and a full range of amenities including WiFi, a year-round heated outdoor pool, and in-room massage therapy and weekly yoga classes. Situated in the heart of Stockbridge, MA, the Inn is centrally located near major cultural events and venues and is a patron of the Berkshires’ visual and performing arts. www.redlioninn.com

IS183 Art School of the Berkshires is a non-profit community art school encouraging people of all ages, means and skill levels to enrich their lives through hands-on experience in the visual arts. The art school’s reach extends throughout Berkshire County and neighboring states to attract more than 2,500 people per year to classes, workshops, in-school programs, events and camps.

To learn more, call IS183 Art School 413-298-5252 x100 or check out IS183.org for a complete list of programs. Enjoy classes taught by professional artists in drawing, painting, sculpture, ceramics, photography, fiber, collage, jewelry, writing, and more for upcoming classes, workshops, events, intensives, even camps that fit all sorts of schedules, from weekends to daytime slots.

Chesterwood Opens Daily for Season on May 26

Chesterwood, the summer home, studio and gardens of America’s foremost sculptor of public monuments, Daniel Chester French (1850-1931), will open for the season on Saturday, May 26 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Guided tours of French’s studio and residence will be offered daily from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. with general admission, through Oct. 8.

From 9 to 10 a.m. on Saturday, May 26, the public is invited to a ribbon cutting and hike to celebrate the restoration of Chesterwood’s historic Ledges Trail, designed by Daniel Chester French. The free event begins in the main parking lot at Chesterwood at 9 a.m., followed by a guided hike of the trail with staff from the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area and the Greenagers.

“As a partner program of the National Park Service, we place a high value on preserving and celebrating the historic resources of the upper Housatonic River valley,” said Dan Bolognani, executive director of the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area. “We’re especially pleased to assist with the Greenagers / Chesterwood partnership to restore this important historical landmark, and to facilitate a dimension of youth engagement.”

Restoration of the Ledges Trail was made possible through a grant from the Upper Housatonic Valley National Heritage Area, the National Trust for Historic Preservation Historic Sites Fund, and the National Trust’s Joe and Marge Grills Fund. Admission is free for the ribbon-cutting event, which will be held the hour before Chesterwood’s official season opening at 10 a.m.

Prior to opening day, Chesterwood will hold a ticketed Preview Opening Reception of its new Permanent Collections Gallery on Friday, May 25 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. The gallery features more than 150 sculptures by Daniel Chester French and portraits of the artist and family members from its permanent collection. The works of art will be on view for the first time in the new gallery, generously underwritten by the Henry Luce Foundation.

The event is co-chaired by Michael Lynch, Chair of the Chesterwood Advisory Council, and Susan Moyle Lynch, and is sponsored by Four Seasons Heating and Cooling; Anita Jorgensen Lighting Design; Jeff Daly Design; Monica Berry Art Conservation, LLC; Pamela Sandler Architect LLC; Allegrone Companies; Nejaime’s Wine Cellar; and T Square Design Studio. Tickets are $75 for members and $95 for non-members. For reservations and more information, contact Margaret Cherin at mcherin@savingplaces.org and 413-298-2034.

Norman Rockwell Museum Expands Regional and National Education Outreach Appoints Mary A. Berle to New Leadership Position Chief Educator

The Norman Rockwell Museum today announced the appointment of Mary A. Berle, a Harvard-trained educator, who is the current Principal of Muddy Brook Elementary School, in Great Barrington, MA, as the Rockwell Museum’s new Chief Educator. Ms. Berle will officially join the Museum on September 1, 2018, assuming a newly created senior-level position to lead the Museum’s education vision at a pivotal time of growth. In this position, she will build on the strengths of the Museum’s robust education program currently led by Chief Curator Stephanie Plunkett and Digital Learning Director Rich Bradway.

As a member of the Museum’s strategic leadership team Ms. Berle will oversee all aspects of the Museum’s educational programs, including distance-learning and digital initiatives to grow regional, national, and global engagement. Partnering with Bradway, who has led the creation of numerous digital learning platforms, including the online Curriculum Lab, the Museum’s App, gallery interactives, and VR experiences, she will ensure that Norman Rockwell Museum meets the increasing demand for digital access to content. In her new role, Ms. Berle will build upon the existing strengths and prolific content creation for all audiences and will guide the Museum forward in planning, execution, and distribution of its learning and engagement experiences.

Laurie Norton Moffatt, Director/CEO of Norman Rockwell Museum, says, “The appointment of Mary Berle as the Museum’s chief educator is truly propitious. The timing and pace of our growth call for an education leader of Mary’s proven talents and I am delighted she chose to join our team.” Norton Moffatt added, “We are thrilled to have someone with Mary’s superb expertise as an innovative educator to champion our path forward as a national leader in Museum learning and education. Her unique expertise with visual learning will grow the Museum’s national educational footprint.”

Ms. Berle noted, “I am beyond thrilled to join the extraordinarily talented and courageous team at the Norman Rockwell Museum at a time when innovation in the educational landscape is desperately needed. I have long admired the Museum’s deep commitment to education and its passionate education team, led by Stephanie Plunkett, Tom Daly, Patrick O’Donnell, and Rich Bradway, who have laid the groundwork to integrate museum assets and visual learning into the larger educational ecosystem, locally, regionally, nationally and internationally. Together we will build on existing work and create exceptional learning experiences for a wide range of audiences around the globe.”

Mary Berle

Ms. Berle joins the Museum as she concludes 13 years of service with the Berkshire Hills Regional School District, where she currently serves as principal of Muddy Brook Elementary School in Great Barrington. During her tenure in the district, she created a unique-in-the-nation innovative Collaborative Care model to support students and families in working with both the school system and health-care providers to support student success.

Prior to joining the Berkshire Hills District, Ms. Berle created inquiry-based math and science curricula for TERC (formerly Technical Education Research Center) in Cambridge, MA, a non-profit organization dedicated to advancing the teaching and learning of mathematics for all students and teachers. These large-scale projects were funded by the National Science Foundation and published by National Geographic and Pearson Education and are widely used across the nation’s schools and internationally. Ms. Berle has further demonstrated success in procuring and managing local, state and federal education grant funding.

Mary Berle has an A.B. in Visual and Environmental Studies from Harvard College and her Master’s in Education in Human Development, also from Harvard. The Department of Visual and Environmental Studies (VES) cultivates skills in both the practice and the critical study of the visual arts. Its components include photography, filmmaking, animation, video art, painting, drawing, printmaking and sculpture, as well as film and visual studies, critical theory, and the study of the built environment.

She is the mother of three children, Louisa, Thomas and David and makes her home in Stockbridge. A big picture thinker and doer, Mary has ridden a bicycle down the coast from Seattle to Los Angeles and then across the United States. An equally inspiring cycling feat is her weekly unicycle program at Muddy Brook School, where over 200 students have mastered wheeling around on one wheel, including demonstrating their skills in the Stockbridge Memorial Day Parade.

 

ART HISTORY GRADUATES SHARE SCHOLARLY RESEARCH AT CLARK ART INSTITUTE

The Williams Graduate Program in the History of Art, sponsored jointly by Williams College and the Clark Art Institute, presents the twenty-third annual Spring Symposium on Friday, June 1 from 9 am–5 pm. The event, free and open to the public, will be held in the Clark’s auditorium, located in the Manton Research Center.

Members of the masters of arts graduate class of 2018 present papers on wide array of topics. Consideration of broad themes is undertaken as well as discussions of single works of art.

Symposium papers are developed from longer qualifying papers that each student writes during the second-year winter study period, revising and refining work from an earlier seminar. The symposium is comprised of public, scholarly presentations aimed to inform and challenge those interested in the visual arts.

Among the premier art education programs in the world, the graduate program has produced more than 500 graduates who have taken their place as leaders in the art and academic fields. The Clark and Williams work together to offer their professional staffs, libraries, and art collections to the students as invaluable resources. Program professors are drawn from both institutions. The program is housed at the Clark, whose extensive research facilities support the academic scholarship conducted by the students.

Bidwell House Museum Begins 2018 Season with a Concert and Reception!

The Bidwell House Museum, the Berkshires’ own early American history museum, will open for the season on Memorial Day weekend. Tours will begin on Monday, May 28th at 11 a.m. The Museum is opening with a concert and reception on Sunday, May 27th, at 3 p.m.  Singer-songwriter Diane Taraz will perform “A Silver Dagger: Exploring Women’s History Through Folksongs.”

Passed down for generations, folk songs show centuries of attitudes and beliefs that have fascinating echoes in our lives today. Women left few written records, but we can learn much about them through the music they used to speed their work, lift their spirits, or ease an aching heart. With a sparkling voice and wry humor, Diane performs songs of love, childbirth, marriage and adventure in traditional dress and accompanies her singing with lap dulcimer and English guitar (the type of instrument played by women back then). She often sings with voice alone, the most authentic style, exploring the joys and sorrows of a world lit only by fire.

A Pittsfield native, Diane has long made her home in the Boston area, performing extensively throughout New England. She is the director of the Lexington Historical Society Colonial Singers and a longtime member of the Gloucester Hornpipe & Clog Society. Her recordings are available through her website at www.dianetaraz.com.

A reception to celebrate the end of a successful capital campaign and the newly completed restoration of the house will follow the concert.  Refreshments will be served. Attendance is free, though donations are welcome. The Bidwell House Museum is located at 100 Art School Road. For more information, please call 413-528-6888 or go to www.bidwellhousemuseum.org.

The Bidwell House Museum is a New England heritage site providing a personal encounter with history, early American home life, and the Berkshire landscape through its land, house and collection. The Museum is a non-profit educational institution for the benefit of the community and today’s audiences of all ages, dedicated to preservation, scholarship and enjoyment of the landmark site.

The Museum is open Thursdays to Mondays (closed Tuesdays and Wednesdays) from 11 am to 4 pm with tours on the hour, Memorial Day to Columbus Day. The museum grounds — 192 acres of woods, fields, historic stonewalls, trails and picnic sites — are open all year free of charge. The program of events can be found on the museum’s website: www.bidwellhousemuseum.org.

Golda Lox Bagel Fundraiser for the Berkshires’ Jewish Festival of Books

Hevreh of Southern Berkshire and The Great Barrington Bagel Company & Deli are pleased to be collaborating on a very special fundraiser for the Berkshires’ Jewish Festival of Books in honor of Israel’s 70th Anniversary. The festival will take place at Hevreh of Southern Berkshire, 270 State Road in Great Barrington, Massachusetts from Thursday, July 26th through Sunday, July 29th.

Co-presented by Hevreh and Jewish Federation of the Berkshires, in partnership with the Jewish Book Council, and with the generous support of the Harold Grinspoon Foundation, the festival will feature free and fee-based lectures, teachings and readings by internationally acclaimed authors in genres ranging from adult fiction to children’s literature to cookbooks.

The opening night author on Thursday, July 26th at 7 p.m. is Jewish and Feminist icon Francine Klagsbrun who, among the more than a dozen books she has authored, also edited The First Ms. Reader, and Free to Be … You and Me. At the festival, Ms. Klagsbrun will be discussing her latest book, Lioness, the definitive biography of Golda Meir – the only female Prime Minister in Israel’s history – which won the top prize at this year’s National Jewish Book Awards, when it was recognized as the Everett Family Foundation Book of the Year.
In honor of Ms. Klagsbrun’s appearance, Israel’s 70th Anniversary, and Prime Minister Meir herself, The Great Barrington Bagel Company & Deli has created a special Golda Lox sandwich on a blue and white bagel, the colors of Israel’s flag.

For every sandwich sold between Memorial Day on May 28th, and the end of the festival on July 29th, Barrington Bagel will donate $1 to the book festival to support its aim of bringing world class authors to the Berkshires each summer.

Barrington Bagel has also generously offered to contribute $1 to the festival for each sale of half-pound and one pound prepackaged lox from the cooler.

Miniature Golda action figures will also be available for sale at the counter as will Ms. Klagsbrun’s book. For more information, to view the full festival lineup, or to make reservations, call Hevreh at 413-528-6378, or visit hevreh.org. Hevreh will also have books available for advance purchase in the lobby, which all the authors will be happy to sign at the festival.

The Second Annual Berkshire Jewish Festival of Books

The Berkshires’ second annual Jewish Festival of Books will take place at Hevreh of Southern Berkshire in Great Barrington, Massachusetts from Thursday, July 26th through Sunday, July 29th. Co-presented by Hevreh and Jewish Federation of the Berkshires, in partnership with the Jewish Book Council, and with the generous support of the Harold Grinspoon Foundation, the festival will feature free and fee-based lectures, teachings and readings by internationally acclaimed authors in genres ranging from adult fiction to children’s literature to cookbooks.

The opening night author on Thursday, July 26th at 7 p.m. is Jewish and Feminist icon Francine Klagsbrun who, among the more than a dozen books she has authored, also edited The First Ms. Reader, and Free to Be … You and Me. Ms. Klagsbrun will be discussing her latest book, Lioness, the definitive biography of Golda Meir. The book won the top prize at this year’s National Jewish Book Awards when it was recognized as the Everett Family Foundation Book of the Year. The festival ends with another literary lioness and National Jewish Book Award Winner on its closing day, on Sunday, July 29th at 10 a.m., when Rachel Kadish reads from and discusses her latest novel,
the National Jewish Book Award Winning The Weight of Ink, which interweaves the story of two remarkable women and scholars – a 17th century Jewish scribe in London, and the 21st century researcher who discovers her.

In between these two signature events, other highlights of the festival include the following: On Friday, July 27th at 10:45 a.m. renowned Jewish cookbook author, Paula Shoyer, discusses her latest book, The Healthy Jewish Kitchen. Who knew there was such a thing?
That evening, on Friday, July 27th, following the 6:15 p.m. Shabbat evening service, and again at 12p.m. on Saturday, July 28th immediately following Shabbat morning services at 10 a.m, Rabbi Judith Schindler will share separate teachings from her latest book, Recharging Judaism: How Civic Engagement is Good for Synagogues, Jews, and America. Rabbi Schindler is Rabbi Emerita of Temple Beth El in Charlotte, North Carolina, and the Sklut Professor of Jewish Studies and Director of the Stan Greenspon Center for Peace and Social Justice at Queens University of Charlotte. Then on Saturday, July 28th at 4 p.m., as part of the internationally acclaimed Drag Queen Story Hour,
the festival will feature a Sparkle Havdalah and reading of Leslea Newman’s Sparkle Boy. Children and parents will have the opportunity to get their sparkle on, and enjoy a hands-on Havdalah and some sweet Shabbat treats. All of the other festival events will also offer refreshments, and The Healthy Jewish Kitchen event will include lunch featuring recipes from the book.

For more information, or to make reservations, call Hevreh at 413-528-6378, or visit hevreh.org. Hevreh will also have books available for advance purchase in the lobby, which the authors will be happy to sign at the festival.

CLARK ART INSTITUTE PRESENTS VIDEO EXHIBITION OF WORKS BY JENNIFER STEINKAMP

The Clark Art Institute will present the work of Los Angeles-based media and installation artist Jennifer Steinkamp as the subject of its first video exhibition. The exhibition, Jennifer Steinkamp: Blind Eye, consists of six pieces including a new projection, Blind Eye, conceived by the artist to interact with the Clark’s 140-acre setting and the architecture of the Lunder Center at Stone Hill. The exhibition is on view June 30–October 8, 2018.

“This exhibition is particularly exciting for the Clark. Jennifer Steinkamp’s work will intrigue and surprise our visitors,” said Olivier Meslay, the Felda and Dena Hardymon Director of the Clark. “The Lunder Center galleries were created to give the Clark spaces that are well-suited for contemporary art. As we celebrate the tenth anniversary of the Lunder Center at Stone Hill, we are energized to present the Clark’s inaugural video exhibition by an artist whose work is so closely aligned with our emphasis on connections between art and nature.”

Steinkamp’s cutting-edge art engages with one of the oldest themes in art history—nature. By deconstructing and re-engineering computer code, the artist utilizes the abstract language of technology to create vibrant images rooted in the natural world. Branches, leaves, and flowers intertwine and overlap in her animations, transfixing viewers with twisting and changing color.

“Jennifer Steinkamp is one of the leading video artists of this generation. While her work can be seen in relation to the tradition of still-life or landscape painting, her unique approach offers an unprecedented opportunity for careful looking and contemplation, deeply engaging the viewer in fascinating and even hypnotic ways,” said Esther Bell, the Clark’s Robert and Martha Berman Lipp Senior Curator.

The Clark’s exhibition is the debut of Blind Eye, a new video installation depicting the seasonal phases of a birch grove. A dizzying perspective, with no forest floor or way out, creates an unsettling tension between the beauty of the fluttering branches and the anthropomorphic, almost ghoulish tree trunks.

Diaspore and two projections of Fly to Mars present meditative interpretations of the natural world. Diaspore consists of a collection of tumbleweeds self-propelled through a landscape. The renderings of the amalgamated shrubs, composed of sticks and leaves, are mesmerizing, mimicking movements in real time and space. In this work, Steinkamp references both the anatomy of plants that disperse seeds and spores and the social phenomenon of diaspora. She uses technology to draw a connection between the dissemination of people and cultures across the world and the ability of plants to spread seeds.

Fly to Mars presents trees that come to life with movement as they cycle through the four seasons of the year. Viewers experience the natural cycle of foliage, from colorful flowering buds in spring to leafless branches in winter. Simultaneously, the trees bow up and down, as though attempting to break free from the earth’s gravity and take flight into the cosmos.

In addition to exploring the theme of nature, Steinkamp’s art also investigates the passage of time, addiction, and beauty. Premature explores the phenomena of life and death. “Our being can start or end so abruptly; this feels dauntingly abstract to me,” Steinkamp said of the subject matter. In the projection, tangled fibrous strands resembling veins, arteries, and tendons move in concert with one another. The artist describes the work as having “meat-like texture which flows along undulating tubular forms.”

Rapunzel references both the issue of children given up by addicted parents in contemporary society and the Grimm Brothers’ nineteenth-century fairytale. The story tells of a pregnant mother craving and becoming obsessed with the rampion flowers that grow in the garden of a neighboring witch, Dame Gothel. The woman’s husband steals flowers from the garden and is caught by the witch, who forces the couple to exchange their daughter for a supply of flowers. Rapunzel illuminates gently swaying vines, creating an enchanted virtual space that evokes Gothel’s garden. An algorithm that simulates hair was used to create the computer-generated undulating vines, and the result is both entrancing and haunting.

Jennifer Steinkamp’s work has been featured in exhibitions across the United States, Europe, and Asia, and is in numerous public and private collections. She is a professor in the department of Design Media Arts at UCLA. Her recent solo exhibitions include Winter Fountains (Benjamin Franklin Parkway, Philadelphia), Digital Nature (Espacio Fundación Telefónica, Madrid), and Jennifer Steinkamp (Portland Art Museum, Portland).

A fully illustrated exhibition catalogue with a foreword by Olivier Meslay and essay by Lisa Saltzman, Starr Director of the Clark’s Research and Academic Program, will accompany the exhibition.  Saltzman’s essay isolates structuring concerns in Steinkamp’s groundbreaking work and sheds new light on one of the most important pioneers in the field of video and new media. The catalogue is published by the Clark and distributed by Yale University Press.

Generous contributors to Jennifer Steinkamp: Blind Eye include Maureen Fennessy Bousa and Edward P. Bousa and Amy and Charlie Scharf.